Sign In Forgot Password

Today's Calendar

Rabbi Mansour Midrash
: 7:00a
 
 
Rabbi Mansour Class Main Midrash
: 7:50a
 
 
Rabbi Yedid Class Upstairs Classrooms
: 7:50a
Rabbi Malka Main Shul
: 8:00a
Rabbi Mizrahi Library
: 8:30a
 
 
Rabbi Malka Class Lower Level
: 8:45a
Rabbi Elbaz Main Shul
: 9:00a
 
 
Rabbi Mizrahi Class Library
: 9:15a
Rabbi Mansour/Rabbi Malka/Rabbi Elbaz Minha Main Midrash
: 6:45p
Rabbi Yedid Minha Library
: 7:15p

Tomorrow's Calendar

 
 
Rabbi Mansour Class Library
: 5:45a
Rabbi Isaac Yedid Midrash
: 5:45a
Rabbi Malka Main Shul
: 6:40a
 
 
Rabbi Mizrahi Class Library
: 6:45a
 
 
Rabbi Yedid Class Upstairs Classroom
: 6:50a
Rabbi Mansour Korbanot Midrash
: 6:50a
Rabbi Mizrahi Library
: 7:20a
 
 
Rabbi Malka Class Lower Level
: 7:30a
 
 
Rabbi Malka Class Lower Level
: 8:00a
 
 
Rabbi Mansour Class Main Midrash
: 8:00a
Rabbi Elbaz Main Shul
: 8:00a
 
 
Rabbi Elbaz Class Lower level
: 8:40a
 
 
Rabbi Mizrahi Class Lower Level
: 8:45a
 
 
Rabbi Malka Class
: 6:35p
Rabbi Mansour/Rabbi Malka/Rabbi Elbaz Minha Main Midrash
: 6:45p
Rabbi Yedid Minha Library
: 7:15p

Friday Night

 
 
Rabbi Mansour Class Main Midrash
: 5:30p
Shir Hashirim First Minyan Main Shul Rabbi Mansour, Rabbi Malka
: 6:15p
Shir HashirimSecond Minyan Main Midrash Rabbi Mizrahi, Rabbi Elbaz, Rabbi Yedid
: 7:00p
Candle Lighting
: 7:23p

Shabbat Day

First Minyan Rabbi Mansour Main Shul
: 6:30a
Early Minyan Rabbi Mizrahi Midrash
: 7:15a
Teenage Minyan Rabbi Gindi Midrash
: 8:45a
Main Minyan Rabbi Malka Main Shul
: 8:45a
Youth Minyan Rabbi Shelby/Rabbi Elbaz Lower Level
: 8:45a
 
 
Rabbi Mizrahi Class
: 8:45a
 
 
Rabbi Yedid Class
: 9:00a
 
 
Rabbi Mansour Class
: 9:00a
 
 
Rabbi Gindi's Class
: 10:45a
 
 
Rabbi Malka Class
: 11:30a
Minha Gedola Ricky Cohen Midrash
: 2:00p
 
 
Rabbi Gindi afternoon class
: 4:35p
 
 
Rabbi Mansour afternoon class
: 5:05p
 
 
Rabbi Yedid Afternoon Class
: 5:05p
 
 
Rabbi Malka/Rabbi Mizrahi afternoon class
: 5:35p
 
 
Rabbi Elbaz afternoon class
: 5:50p
Minha Rabbi Mansour/Rabbi Malka Main Shul
: 6:35p
Minha Rabbi Shelby/ Rabbi Elbaz Lower Level
: 6:35p
Minha Rabbi Mizrahi Midrash
: 6:45p
Seuda Shelisheet Lobby
: 7:00p
Seuda Shelisheet Lower Level Rabbi Shelby
: 7:00p
Rabbi Mansour's Derasha Main Shul
: 7:20p
Habdalah
: 8:19p

Parshat Ki Teitzei

Shabbat, Aug 25

Candle Lighting

Friday, Aug 24, 7:23p

 

Parasha Insights from Rabbi Mansour

Parashat Shoftim - Appointing  a  King  "Over  Me"

In  Parashat  Shoftim  the  Torah  foresees  the  time  after  Benei  Yisrael  settle  the  Land  of  Israel  when  they  will  want  to  appoint  a  king.    The  Torah  writes,  "You  shall  indeed  appoint  a  king  over  yourself,  whom  Hashem  your  God  shall  choose..."  (17:15).  

In  light  of  this  verse,  it  becomes  very  difficult  to  understand  the  reaction  of  the  prophet  Shemuel  when  Benei  Yisrael  in  fact  request  that  he  appoint  for  them  a  king.    As  we  read  in  Sefer  Shemuel  I  (chapter  8),  the  people  approach  Shemuel  with  their  request  and  he  chides  them,  seeing  in  their  request  an  attempt  to  shake  themselves  free  of  God's  kingship  in  favor  of  the  rule  of  a  human  king.    Why  does  Shemuel  react  this  way  to  their  request,  if  the  Torah  explicitly  sanctions  the  appointment  of  a  king?  

The  Keli  Yakar  (Torah  commentary  by  Rabbi  Shlomo  Efrayim  of  Luntchitz,  Poland-Bohemia,  1550-1619)  explained  that  the  people's  request  during  the  time  of  Shemuel  differed  from  the  request  that  Moshe  foresees  here  in  Parashat  Shoftim.    Moshe  foresees  the  people  saying,  "I  shall  appoint  a  king  over  me"  (17:14),  whereas  in  Shemuel's  time  the  people  demanded,  "Appoint  for  us  a  king"  (Shemuel  I  8:5).    In  Moshe's  description,  the  people  ask  that  a  king  be  appointed  "over  them,"  to  rule,  lead,  guide  and  govern.    They  seek  somebody  to  whose  authority  they  would  submit,  and  whose  instructions  they  would  follow.    But  when  the  people  approached  Shemuel,  they  asked,  "Appoint  for  us  a  king";  they  wanted  a  king  "for  themselves,"  somebody  whom  they  could  control,  a  king  who  would  serve  them,  rather  than  whom  they  would  serve.    Shemuel  was  a  tough  leader.    He  led  the  people  with  firm  authority,  and  the  people  had  no  power  or  control  over  him.    They  therefore  asked  for  a  different  kind  of  leadership,  an  authority  figure  without  real  authority,  whom  they  could  manipulate  and  control.  

This  is  why  Shemuel  so  strongly  condemned  their  request.    He  understood  that  they  sought  not  a  leader,  but  a  follower.    A  king  of  this  nature  would  exert  no  authority  over  the  people,  and  they  would  be  free  to  act  as  they  please  and  dictate  their  own  rules.  

Unfortunately,  a  similar  situation  exists  in  many  communities  today,  who  look  for  a  Rabbi  whom  they  can  lead,  rather  than  somebody  to  lead  them.    They  want  the  Rabbi  to  serve  them,  to  say  only  what  they  want  to  hear,  and  not  to  speak  out  against  their  misconduct.    These  communities  don’t  want  a  leader;  they  want  somebody  whom  they  can  lead.  

This  is  the  precise  opposite  of  the  job  of  a  Rabbi.    The  Rabbi's  responsibility  is  to  guide,  lead  and  teach,  to  tell  his  congregation  when  he  observes  improper  conduct  and  to  urge  them  to  change.    Congregations  must  appoint  a  Rabbi  "over  them,"  and  afford  him  the  authority  he  needs  to  lead  them.  

The  Talmud  comments  that  the  generation  before  the  final  redemption  will  resemble  a  dog.    Some  have  explained  that  when  a  person  walks  his  dog,  the  dog  actually  walks  in  front  of  the  owner,  giving  the  appearance  as  though  the  dog  leads  him.    It  is  only  when  they  reach  an  intersection,  and  the  owner  pulls  the  dog  in  the  direction  he  wishes  to  walk,  that  it  becomes  clear  that  it  is  the  owner  who  leads.    In  the  generation  of  insolence  that  will  precede  the  final  redemption,  Rabbis  will  only  give  the  appearance  of  leadership.    But  when  a  community  reaches  an  intersection,  when  an  issue  of  grave  importance  arises,  it  will  become  clear  that  the  congregants  are  the  ones  who  hold  the  leash  and  lead  the  Rabbi.    The  committee  will  tell  the  Rabbi  which  position  to  take,  which  direction  to  follow,  rather  than  following  his  guidance  and  instruction.  

This  is  not  how  it  should  be.    Communities  do  not  need  Rabbis  just  to  agree  with  them  all  the  time,  to  always  tell  them  that  they  are  correct.    To  the  contrary,  Rabbis  must  have  the  courage  to  speak  out  when  necessary,  and  to  lead  and  guide  his  community  along  the  proper  path  of  Torah  and  Mitzvot.

Ohel Yaacob Congregation

Click here to visit our sister Synagogue, the Edmond J Safra Synagogue of Brooklyn, New York.

Classes from our Rabbis

Click here to hear classes from many Rabbis of our Community.

Sun, August 19 2018 8 Elul 5778